AS IF: the blog

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Adaptable. Scalable. Innovative. Flexible… AS IF: the blog

AS IF:AS IF blog

  • Adaptable
  • Scalable
  • Innovative
  • Flexible

Four words in contention for some of the most over-used in B2B tech comms.

Campaigning to keep comms credible

Started in 2011, this blog, which accidentally chronicles Sam’s transition from fledgling freelancer to founder of the virtual agency, is unapologetically honest, and even sometimes insightful.

We hope you enjoy our critiques, laments and constructive musings on all that it takes to make tech comms compelling.

If you want to get in touch about any of the topics raised in the blog, give us a call or connect with us on LinkedIn.

The highs and lows of a fledgling freelancer

11/03/2011

A month into being a freelance PR and each day I lurch from dismay to delight – here’s a taster:

oh that chair looks really comfy..

High – first day, dancing around in my kitchen to Katie Perry ‘Firework’ deciding that was me, that was – a freelance firework.

Low – second day, no fireworks just housework which I never do but now don’t think I can afford for anyone else to do.

Low – first week, emailing myself to see if email was working (it was).

High – first blog, getting comments and being retweeted.

High – first client meeting, in a cake shop. Decided henceforth all client meetings shall be held in cake shops.

Low – first follow up, realising notes taken in said cake shop had to be actioned by me, and they take AGES!

High – office view, it looks out on to a snowdrop-littered garden with a giant rabbit hopping around in it. His name is Maximus.

High – office colleague, my desk has a cushion with a small cat on it. Her name is Lily. She looks at me with purry pride.

Low – office banter, turns out giant rabbits and small cats are not that great at office banter.

Low – office comfort, I just can’t get warm and the chair is wildly uncomfortable, I finish the day looking like a frozen Quasimodo.

High – office economies, my new printer was real cheap.

Low – false economies, my cheapo printer doesn’t photocopy I have to walk half a mile and pay 10p pay for one, so takes about 30 mins out of my day.

Low – office technology – still can’t get my Outlook to talk nicely to my HTC phone.

High – food, munching lunch while following the Archers (it’s all going on).

Low – food,  my sandwiches are just not as nice as Prêt, nor is my coffee, I haven’t had a muffin in a month. I don’t know how to make sushi and don’t even mention Burritos.

High –food, lost two pounds in weight, go figure.

High – making decisions, making my own decisions and implementing them in the same 10 minutes is truly liberating.

Low – making mistakes, two hours later, realizing that half the time they are the wrong decisions is somewhat disconcerting.

What can I tell ya, it’s a learning curve…

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Go on step on the grass… when it’s OK to go off message

15/02/2011

Another of Sam Howard’s pet rants subjects:Go on step on the grass... when it's OK to go off message

In PR you hear a lot about being ‘On Message’. This is very important isn’t it? Being On Message, having your people rehearsed and slick, so they can always be On Message? Oh pulllease.

If a journalist knows what you’re going to say before you open your mouth why would he/she bother to rock up for the interview? I mean seriously, what’s in it for them? If they just want the corporate spiel, they’ll check out your website. If they want to talk to you it’s cos there’s a vague hope that in and around the adaptable-scalable-innovative-flexible monologue you might actually have a view, say something interesting, topical, original, human even, and actually provide some decent copy.

The best view to have, I think, is one that runs contra to the stream. Back in the mid 90s when I laboured over my very first press release, I was super diligent about being fact-based and succinct, (I had been trained well, forever in debt Mr Springett) but I didn’t have the confidence to write the quote for my boss. So instead, I wrote, “Say something contentious here.” And he did, and it worked a treat. Mr Caplin, gotta love him and even if you don’t, he always makes great copy.

On occasion, it’s OK to fess up to that slightly dodgy implementation when your record is normally great, and you can demonstrate you have learned from it. Or to admit the recession might be taking its toll on you too, but you are gonna haul your weary backside out of it, or die trying.

You see the joy of sometimes wondering off message means that when you do get back on it, your audience might actually believe you. And isn’t that quite important? Besides, whoever wants to hear somebody else’s diet is going really really well?

When I work with my PR clients we work hard on looking at where we can first and foremost add some value/originality to the debate. You know not everything that comes out of your mouth is necessarily going to be that great and that’s where your trusted PR comes in – they can tell you what to run with and what not to bother banging on about, because it is irrelevant or just actually not that interesting. Sometimes it is all about the team singing from the same hymn sheet, but other times you just need to know a good tune.

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Determined to be in PR? That’s handy

04/02/2011

Sam Howard asked a question of the UK Technology Journalists and PR Group on LinkedIn – what makes a great PR? One word answers only.

Determined to be in PR? That's handy

At the time I wrote this I’d had 41 answers from presumably a random selection of PRs. Having turned freelance only weeks ago I have some time on my hands so I tidied it up a bit and here’s a word cloud of how it looked…

If you add to ‘determined’ ‘resilient’ and ‘resourceful’ you’re looking at about a third of the vote. Seems we are just as well-suited to being long distance runners, a mountain climbers, swimming the channel or something else equally draining. ‘Strategic’ always a good one, gets a double name check, as does ‘personable’ and ‘creativity’, my own guilty pleasure.

Not sure about ‘magical’ myself, but I guess if you are the rest of it is easy.

But the one for me is ‘credible’. To be credible in front of your clients, your journalists, your team and your management generates trust, mutual respect and a sustainable reputation. After 16 years in this industry, my integrity, if not my ego is just about intact. Doesn’t mean I was ever the most popular girl in the room, and I was certainly an acquired taste among our clients, some of which we thought it best if I never met. But, as I used to whimper when I’d lock myself in the bathroom, “I’m not paid to be popular”.

Actually once you let go of the vague hope of ever being popular, it is quite liberating. Give it a go if you haven’t already.

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